Everson Museum Celebrates Social Diversity with "Seen and Heard"

In a thorough and inspiring look at our sociopolitical history, the Everson Museum is mounting "Seen and Heard: An Active Commemoration of Women's Suffrage" in recognition of the 100th year anniversary of Women's suffrage in New York state. Opening Friday, June 9 at 6 pm and on view through August 27, the exhibition encompasses works by nine contemporary artists delving into civic engagement and social equality across a range of media. Artists Mildred Beltré, Yvonne Buchanan, Cassils, Lionel Cruet, Stella Marrs, Jessica Posner, Jessica Putnam-Phillips, Kevin Snipes, and Holly Zausner engage with issues of social justice through the lens of photography, ceramics, sculpture, installation and new media. Encouraging a new consideration of sociopolitical engagement with themes of feminism and gender politics, post-colonialism, and civil rights these works challenge the meaning of citizenship and what it means to be represented in the contemporary American political moment. 

work from "Dreamwork" series by artist Mildred Beltre (image courtesy the artist)

work from "Dreamwork" series by artist Mildred Beltre (image courtesy the artist)

The exhibition challenges social hierarchy and hegemony by offering a thought-provoking and multi-sensory experience. Jessica Putnam Phillips' lush juxtaposition of sleek porcelain with antagonistic military imagery poses questions of agency. Artist Lionel Cruet offers a new perspective on Martinican author Aimé Césaire 's Cahier d'un retour au pays natal (1939) in a contemporary, new media format, breathing new life into the ongoing discussions surrounding the implications of post-colonialism in the contemporary moment.

"At the End of Daybreak" Lionel Cruet (2017)(installation view) image courtesy the artist 

"At the End of Daybreak" Lionel Cruet (2017)(installation view) image courtesy the artist 

Cassils offers an insightful and assertive perspective on LGBTQ and transgender issues through performance and employing the body as a form of social sculpture. Stella Marrs' innovative interdisciplinary approach to feminism and feminist-directed narratives provides food for thought decidedly in in line with the theme of suffrage. The Everson has mounted a multi-perspective vision into what suffrage, and representation, means in a society that both allows access to diverse populations and omits requisite attention to ongoing themes of discrimination within parallel social groups, asking can we all be seen and heard equally in a politically tense environment.

Butter Body Politic (Butterface) Jessica Posner, (2016) film still. Image courtesy the Everson Museum. 

Butter Body Politic (Butterface) Jessica Posner, (2016) film still. Image courtesy the Everson Museum. 

The exhibition is on view at the Everson Museum in Syracuse, NY through August 2, 2017 with opening reception from 6 pm Friday, June 9 2017. More information at the museum's website.